geekiness(josh lubarr)

Geeky, nerdy, dweeby fun

Tag: equationizing

A few backlogged equations, part two

The one that I really want to note is 5/24/12, as in

5 * (2.4) = 12

and if the fact that I like that doesn’t prove I’m a geek, I don’t know what does.

Just to be thorough, here’s what else we’ve missed since I last posted:

5/20/12 — 5 = 2 + 0 + 1 + 2 — pleasantly simple

5/21/12 — 5 – 2 – 1^1 = 2 — a little cheesy

5/22/12 — 5 – 2 – 2 + 1 = 2

5/23/12 — 5 = √(23 + 1 * 2) — going in order but treating the 23 as a full number; can you live with it?

5/25/12 — 5 = √25 * 1^2 — meh

5/26/12 — √(5 * 2 – 6) * 1 = 2 — frankly, multiplying by 1 always bugs me

5/27/12 — 5 * 2 = 7 + 1 + 2 — not bad

5/28/12 — 5 * 2 – 8 ^ 1 = 2 — not too keen on the “^1” either

5/29/12 — 5 – 2 + 9 = 12  OR  5 * 2 – 9 + 1 = 2 — both fine

5/30/12 — 5 – 3 – 0 = 1 * 2 — ecch

5/31/12 — 5 – 3 + √(1 + 1 + 2) — at least it doesn’t multiply by 1, put to the power of 1, or have the dreaded “+ 1 – 1” in it

 

 

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10/7/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Another challenging one, like yesterday. If we include the year and change the order, at least we can have

√(7+2) = 1 + 1 + 1

which is valid but forced us to cut too many corners for my taste.

10/6/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Now we start getting into the dates that are a little more challenging, which is nice.

Yes, of course, we can change the order and get

6^0 + 1 = 1 + 1

but it would be awfully nice not to have to do that. We can include the year, which yields the obvious

√(1^0 * 6) – 2 + 1 = 1

but I’m not so big on that one either. And there’s also

1^0^6 = 1 * 1

which ignores the 6, which is also not so great.

All equations, but none too elegant.

10/5/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Okay, no shenanigans, like yesterday, just the facts:

1 = √(5-1) – 1

though it’s awfully tempting to see this one as

10 – 5 = (1 + 1)

but that breaks the basic rules of converting one part of the date into digits and not the others.

10/4/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

This one’s just like the last few — simplistic, but almost elegant. Just for fun, I’ll include all the digits, and even the special bonus equation at the end. First, the basics:

1^0 * √4 = 1 + 1

or, if that looks sloppy to you (it does to me)

√(1^0 * 4) = 1 + 1

or

√(1 *  (0 + 4)) = 1 + 1

And now the bonus equation, starting from 10/04/2011,

1^0^0 * 4 = 2 + 0 + 1 + 1

of, if you want to leave out all those 0’s and 1’s that are just playing games to make themselves disappear, you get

4 = 2 + 1 + 1

or even

√4 = 2

 

10/3/11 — today’s equation

Like yesterday, this is a little simplistic, but maybe the whole premise is simplistic. (For background, see Equationizing.)

It’s actually almost (almost!) elegant:

1 = 3 – 1 -1

QED, if I dare use that here.

10/2/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Back in the day, I’d have created today’s equation based on the fact that √2 is both 1.414… and -1.414…, so that

10 – (√2/√2) = 11

but that seems cheesy to me now.

Unfortunately, that still leaves us with an unsatisfying mix of options, like

1 = 2 – 1 * 1

or, if you take the digits out of order,

2^1 = 1^1^1

or even

2^0 = 1 = 1 = 1

Nothing too exciting, and I would hope anyone geeky enough to be interested in reading this would have found those.