geekiness(josh lubarr)

Geeky, nerdy, dweeby fun

Tag: equationizing

A few backlogged equations, part two

The one that I really want to note is 5/24/12, as in

5 * (2.4) = 12

and if the fact that I like that doesn’t prove I’m a geek, I don’t know what does.

Just to be thorough, here’s what else we’ve missed since I last posted:

5/20/12 — 5 = 2 + 0 + 1 + 2 — pleasantly simple

5/21/12 — 5 – 2 – 1^1 = 2 — a little cheesy

5/22/12 — 5 – 2 – 2 + 1 = 2

5/23/12 — 5 = √(23 + 1 * 2) — going in order but treating the 23 as a full number; can you live with it?

5/25/12 — 5 = √25 * 1^2 — meh

5/26/12 — √(5 * 2 – 6) * 1 = 2 — frankly, multiplying by 1 always bugs me

5/27/12 — 5 * 2 = 7 + 1 + 2 — not bad

5/28/12 — 5 * 2 – 8 ^ 1 = 2 — not too keen on the “^1” either

5/29/12 — 5 – 2 + 9 = 12  OR  5 * 2 – 9 + 1 = 2 — both fine

5/30/12 — 5 – 3 – 0 = 1 * 2 — ecch

5/31/12 — 5 – 3 + √(1 + 1 + 2) — at least it doesn’t multiply by 1, put to the power of 1, or have the dreaded “+ 1 – 1” in it

 

 

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10/7/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Another challenging one, like yesterday. If we include the year and change the order, at least we can have

√(7+2) = 1 + 1 + 1

which is valid but forced us to cut too many corners for my taste.

10/6/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Now we start getting into the dates that are a little more challenging, which is nice.

Yes, of course, we can change the order and get

6^0 + 1 = 1 + 1

but it would be awfully nice not to have to do that. We can include the year, which yields the obvious

√(1^0 * 6) – 2 + 1 = 1

but I’m not so big on that one either. And there’s also

1^0^6 = 1 * 1

which ignores the 6, which is also not so great.

All equations, but none too elegant.

10/5/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Okay, no shenanigans, like yesterday, just the facts:

1 = √(5-1) – 1

though it’s awfully tempting to see this one as

10 – 5 = (1 + 1)

but that breaks the basic rules of converting one part of the date into digits and not the others.

10/4/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

This one’s just like the last few — simplistic, but almost elegant. Just for fun, I’ll include all the digits, and even the special bonus equation at the end. First, the basics:

1^0 * √4 = 1 + 1

or, if that looks sloppy to you (it does to me)

√(1^0 * 4) = 1 + 1

or

√(1 *  (0 + 4)) = 1 + 1

And now the bonus equation, starting from 10/04/2011,

1^0^0 * 4 = 2 + 0 + 1 + 1

of, if you want to leave out all those 0’s and 1’s that are just playing games to make themselves disappear, you get

4 = 2 + 1 + 1

or even

√4 = 2

 

10/3/11 — today’s equation

Like yesterday, this is a little simplistic, but maybe the whole premise is simplistic. (For background, see Equationizing.)

It’s actually almost (almost!) elegant:

1 = 3 – 1 -1

QED, if I dare use that here.

10/2/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Back in the day, I’d have created today’s equation based on the fact that √2 is both 1.414… and -1.414…, so that

10 – (√2/√2) = 11

but that seems cheesy to me now.

Unfortunately, that still leaves us with an unsatisfying mix of options, like

1 = 2 – 1 * 1

or, if you take the digits out of order,

2^1 = 1^1^1

or even

2^0 = 1 = 1 = 1

Nothing too exciting, and I would hope anyone geeky enough to be interested in reading this would have found those.

10/1/11 — today’s equation

As if you have to think about it?

10 + 1 = 11

of

1^0^1^1 = 1

if you want to get cute about it.

(For background, see Equationizing.)

9/30/11 — today’s equation

(For background, see Equationizing.)

Nothing too exotic today, but lots of digits that have to perform no-ops, so not too cool:

√9 = 3 + 0 * 1 * 1

which is a little unsatisfying. Here’s something a little better:

√9 = 3^0 + 1 + 1

so at least the zero and the ones aren’t just disappearing out the equation.

9/29/11 — today’s equation

For backgroumd, see the Equationizing page.

So, it’s also the anniversary birthday of my long-passed childhood pet. She was a very sweet dog and could catch tennis balls on the fly.

If we have to go to the digits, today is preposterously easy. It’s almost pleasant how simple it is:

9 + 2 = 9 + 1 + 1

or

9 * 2 = 9 * (1+1)

or

9 ^ 2 = 9 ^ (1+1)

I guess you could choose an equation depending on what your favorite operation is. And if you actually have a favorite operation, you’re probably in the right place. If you prefer other operations, you could, of course, use those.  Those operations, like subtraction, are left as an exercise for the reader, though that’s about as much exercise as walking to the refrigerator.