geekiness(josh lubarr)

Geeky, nerdy, dweeby fun

An aggregated ranking of Black Mirror episodes (through season 4)

If:

  • You’re working your way through the Black Mirror episodes (as I am)
  • You decide you want to watch them from “worst” to “best” or “least great” to “most great” or whatever (as I am)
  • You’re kind of geeky and data-driven (as I am)

Then you might not be satisfied with just one list of ranked Black Mirror episodes. In fact, you might go looking and find eight of them. Then you might make a spreadsheet of them. Then you might post it on the Internets:

black-mirror-4season-ranking-aggregation

Since these are lists from least liked to most liked, the top listings, with higher numbers, are less esteemed than the bottom listings, with lower numbers. Specifically, the least-well-thought-of episode is The Waldo Moment (season 2, episode 3) and the most-well-thought-of episode is San Junipero (season 3, episode 4).

I have no idea who wrote any of these lists, which means that I’m trusting the opinions of random people on the Internet, which I know can be quasi- or very ill-advised. However, there’s the idea of the wisdom of crowds, though I haven’t read the book; however, I once read an article in the New Yorker about TED talks in which an audience guessed the weight of an ox within a few pounds, so I figured I’d try it with Black Mirror episodes, even though the sample size is really small.

As you can imagine, my citing any of these lists is not any kind of endorsement, though I do regularly look at New York Magazine’s Daily Intelligencer for news, which is how I saw the Vulture list, which is what prompted me to actually start watching episodes. Also, there are other rankings available, but I only used those that had all four of the first four seasons. And I stopped at eight lists, because that was enough, though my desire for simpler decimals makes me want to have ten, but I’m not going to bother with it.

Here are the sites I used:

Enjoy!


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Proud or Jealous — I’m Actually Not Sure

I recently learned that my blog is among the “Most Popular Geekiness Websites” according to WebStatsDomain, which is a site that I personally have never heard of but that rates web sites and at least appears not to have infected my computer with malware. That’s something that makes me proud, or at least “proud.” It is, says WebStatsDomain, the tenth most popular geekiness web site in the world — the friggin’ WORLD.

However, the blog of mine that is among these astonishingly popular geekiness web sites IS NOT THIS ONE. It’s my food site, joshlubarrfood.wordpress.com, so now my geekiness blog is jealous of my food blog. My food blog is probably going to start lording it over all the other ones, too. Also, my humor blog will probably get upset that I’m goofing around here and not there. Then they’re all going to start fighting, and I’ll have to separate them. Sad.

The places to hear from me, if you can stand the infighting:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Places – Good Things around Boston, and Elsewhere
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com

Better Than Ghoti?

A lot of people have heard about George Bernard Shaw’s phonetic spelling of ghoti for fish;

  • gh is pronounced as in rough.
  • o is pronounced as in women.
  • ti is pronounced as in nation.

Here’s a more outrageous one that I recently learned about: it’s by Godfrey Dewey in his English Spelling: Roadblock to Reading, and it’s phtheighchound for taken:

  • phth is pronounced as in phthisic (also, phthisis, which has its own definition).
  • eigh is pronounced as in weigh.
  • ch is pronounced as in school.
  • ou is pronounced as in glamour.
  • nd is pronounced as in handsome.

H/T: The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, second edition, by David Crystal (who has been involved with a number of interesting books about Shakespeare and language).

The places to hear from me:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Places – Good Things around Boston, and Elsewhere
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com

The Double Thanks

Not to be confused with double secret probation, of course.

The double thanks occurs primarily in corporate settings. Consider the following scenario: Sally approaches Bob for some assistance, such as answering a question. Bob answers the question. Once they complete their exchange and she is ready to depart, Sally expresses her gratitude and says “thanks” to Bob.

We are now approaching the significant moment.

Bob replies. However, he does not, as would be expected, say “you’re welcome” or “any time” or “no problem” or any other such answer that acknowledges that he has helped Sally. No. Rather, he falls into what I hypothesize is the (frequently corporate) trap of wanting to make sure that he has been polite to Sally and gives off the appearance of gratitude (even if he lacks the feeling of gratitude), so he replies her “thanks” by saying to her: “thanks.”

This is the double thanks or, as it is sometimes known, the corporate double thanks.

Here it is in action:

Sally: Can you help me with blah blah blah?
Bob: Sure.
Sally: Blah blah blah question?
Bob: Blah blah blah answer.
Sally: Blah blah blah. Great! Thanks.
Bob: Thanks.
(Exeunt severally Sally and Bob.)

As you can see, there is some insincere thanking going on here — which is why I wanted to point this out. I first noticed this activity in the mid-to-late ‘nineties (’95 – ’97); unfortunately, it was not a passing phenomenon. Perhaps together we can stop this scourge — and by “scourge,” I mean something that is not actually a scourge.

Thanks.

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The places to hear from me:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com

My 2014 Nerd Bona Fides

A while back, FiveThirtyEight* published some raw data and I noticed something in it that was goofy enough for them to mention it in More Data Analysts Went Looking For the South And Midwest, And Here’s What They Found. Thanks to Walt Hickey for all that.

Now you know I’m a nerd, as if the content of this web site were insufficient data for you.

*I was going to spell it as “Five-Thirty Eight,” but I conform to their style, even though some might take issue with that, because it’s Nate Silver — and he kept me sane through President Obama’s re-election campaign.

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The places to hear from me:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com

The “No” of Affirmation

Have you ever heard anyone, including yourself, begin an affirmative response to a statement with the word “no”? For example:

Person 1: I think Idiocracy is hilarious.

Person 2: No, I do, too.

I promise you — you have. It’s an interesting phenomenon, since the statement is one of agreement or affirmation, yet it begins with a term of disagreement or negation. Why, you may ask? I have asked as well. Habits of speech? I would say so.

In any case, now that you’ve heard about it, you can start listening for it. You may be surprised at how often you hear it — I was (especially from myself).

(Cross-posted at Le Repository du Silliness.)

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The places to hear from me:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com

my nerd bona fides

Just ran across this and thought I’d brag about it: being acknowledged in one of the earliest Kerberos papers: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.txt I helped with the editing, not the technical stuff.

The places to hear from me:
Food – josh lubarr food stuff
Geekiness – geekiness(josh lubarr)
Movies – Old Movies and New with Josh Lubarr
Politics – Progressive Politics (per Josh Lubarr)
Silliness and comedy – Le Repository du Silliness, avec Josh Lubarr
Favorite movies – The Pantheon
Me generally – Josh Lubarr’s web site extraordinaire
Also also – Josh’s Part of lubarr.com